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Roger Stone reportedly pleads to Trump through Alex Jones as jury deliberates his fate: Please “pardon me”

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Longtime Trump associate Roger Stone on Thursday reportedly begged the president to pardon him through a message sent to InfoWars far-right conspiracy theorist Alex Jones as the jury deliberated his fate.

Stone, 68, a former Trump 2016 campaign adviser and longtime Republican operative, reportedly sent a message to Jones asking to be pardoned while being tried in federal court in Washington D.C. over seven charges of lying to Congress about his relationship with WikiLeaks.

“Roger Stone’s message is this,” Jones said during Thursday’s broadcast of Infowars’ The Alex Jones Show, “He expected to be convicted. He said, ‘Only a miracle can save me now,’ that was exact words to me last night and this morning.”

“And he said to me, ‘Alex, barring a miracle, I appeal to God and I appeal to your listeners for prayer, and I appeal to the president to pardon me because to do so would be an action that would show these corrupt courts that they’re not going to get away with persecuting people for their free speech or for the crime of getting the president elected,'” Jones continued, adding that Stone asserted, “If we don’t do that, it will embolden their criminal activity.”

Stone is at the heart of the question of whether Trump’s 2016 campaign worked with WikiLeaks or Russia to leak private emails from the Democratic National Committee (DNC) and 2016 Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton’s campaign during the election. Stone and Trump have been friends for over 30 years and if he is convicted, he faces up to 20 years in prison. However, Stone could serve a lesser sentence as he is a non-violent first time offender.

Roger Stone
Roger Stone, former advisor to U.S. President Donald Trump, departs federal court on November 14, 2019 in Washington, DC.
Win McNamee/Getty

The jury in Stone’s criminal trial ended Thursday, the first day of deliberations, without reaching verdict as to whether the political consultant lied to Congress. He has plead not guilty to all seven counts of obstruction, witness tampering and issuing false statements to lawmakers in the House of Representatives during an Intelligence Committee investigation into possible 2016 Russian campaign meddling.

Later in the segment, Jones speculated on whether Trump will grant Stone a pardon.

“So will the president listen to his cowardly advisers and not pardon Stone because he believes if he does that that somehow validates the Russia connection?” he said. “When this man has not been indicted for Russian connection.”

He added: “These libtard jurors know damn well he’s innocent. But they want to sit there and feel all officious and powerful and send him to prison, hoping for some victory against flyover country that they despite so much, that they’re so angry they don’t have control of.”

Stone was indicted and arrested in an early morning raid by the FBI in January. The charges stemmed from former special counsel Robert Mueller’s length investigation into possible Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Stone previously hosted War Room, an InfoWars show.





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Washington Post pans ‘A Warning,’ rips Trump official for staying anonymous

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The controversial anti-Trump book written by the anonymous Trump official is apparently so dull that even the liberal Washington Post couldn’t praise it.

The mysterious Trump administration staffer who declared in an infamous 2018 New York Times op-ed that he or she was “part of the resistance” to undermine President Trump wrote the new book called “A Warning,” but the author did not receive much love from Washington Post book critic Carlos Lozada.

“The author claimed to be part of a group fighting for America’s democratic while ‘thwarting Mr. Trump’s more misguided impulses,’ but readers did not learn what sort of work the anonymous writer did or what, if anything, had been thwarted,” Lozada wrote of the op-ed. “However accurate and sobering such characterizations may be, they all belong in a folder labeled Stuff We Already Know. Unfortunately, much of ‘A Warning’ reads like a longer version of the op-ed, purposely vague and avoiding big revelations in order to preserve the author’s anonymity.”

Lozada said he would stop short of calling the author “cowardly” for holding onto anonymity despite the numerous civil servants set to testify as part of the ongoing impeachment inquiry. Still, he labeled the anti-Trump White House official “self-defeating.”

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A Washington Post book critic had some harsh words for the new book from the anonymous Trump administration official.

A Washington Post book critic had some harsh words for the new book from the anonymous Trump administration official.
(iStock, File)

“Anonymity is often granted to acquire additional information, but in this book, it excuses giving less,” Lozado explained. “‘A Warning’ tells us plenty about what Anonymous thinks, not enough about what Anonymous knows. And without learning more about the writer, it’s tough to know what to make of either.”

The Post critic warned readers they would be “barraged by similes” due to the “absence of facts.” He also said it was like other tell-all books from other former government officials: typically “shocking and alarming yet, by this point in the Trump presidency, almost entirely unsurprising.”

“What frustrates about reading ‘A Warning’ is that its author is not a journalist or a former official, but someone still working in the administration at a high level and ostensibly in position to not just chronicle conditions but to affect them. Instead, the book offers an endless encore of senior officials expressing concern to one another,” Lozada continued. “There are moments of detail and revelation, but they usually affirm points long understood about the president. More often in ‘A Warning,’ actions are not taken; they are almost taken… It’s like ‘Profiles in Thinking About Courage.'”

Lozada questioned why the anonymous author remained in the administration if the individual “concluded that the quiet resistance is powerless.”

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“If no longer resisting, what is Anonymous doing, and how is he or she furthering the Trump agenda?” Lozada continued. “That is the tragedy of Trump’s adults in the room; the longer you’re in that room, the less of an adult you become.”

He added, “We don’t need a secret administration insider to tell us to pass the torch of liberty; we need that person to detail whether and how the torch is being doused… without a clearer sense of who Anonymous is and what this person has seen, done and is still doing, “A Warning” does not cut through the noise. It just creates more of it.”



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Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order

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Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order



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Wanted: 10,000 dogs for the largest-ever study on aging in canines

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The researchers, which include teams from the University of Washington School of Medicine and the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, are being funded by the National Institute of Aging, a division the National Institutes of Health.

The researchers’ expertise comes from a wide range of fields and institutions. All together, it will be the largest-ever study on aging in dogs. But their scope expands far beyond: The researchers hope that the information they learn could eventually be applied to humans as well.

“Dogs truly are science’s best friends,” the research team told CNN in a joint statement. “Though they age more rapidly than humans, they get the same diseases of aging, have a rich genetic makeup, and share our environment.”

“By studying aging in dogs,” they said, “we can more quickly expand our knowledge of aging not just in dogs but also in humans.” They added that the group is hopeful that their discoveries could lead to better “prediction, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and prevention of disease.”

Now accepting applicants

Applications to the project are officially open.

Owners can visit the Dog Aging Project’s website to nominate their pooch. The submission process takes less than 10 minutes, and generally consists of questions about your canine to help the researchers learn whether he or she is the right fit.
Have more questions? Here’s a helpful FAQ.
A very good service dog scored a spot in her Arkansas elementary school yearbook

Dogs from all 50 states, and of all ages, sizes, and breeds may apply. The researchers will even consider dogs with chronic illnesses, hoping to include as much genetic diversity as possible.

That will help them identify biological and environmental factors critical to improving overall health and lifespan.

And humans — your participation is welcome too.

“Dogs and their owners are the heart of the Dog Aging Project,” the researchers said. “People who nominate a dog will have the opportunity to partner with our research team as a citizen scientist.”

Owners will be asked to fill out surveys about their dog’s health and life experience, and sample the dog’s saliva, too.



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